fbpx

Portfolio Assignment 3: Synthesis—Reaching “Your Own Idea” | Online Assignment Help

Reminder

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Assignment on
Portfolio Assignment 3: Synthesis—Reaching “Your Own Idea” | Online Assignment Help
Just from $13/Page
Order Now

Your complete set of portfolio activities is the capstone project of this class. Thus, it is in your best interest to carefully read the instructions and information for this assignment and critically think about the best way to answer the question before you prepare and submit your work.

Connections to Learning Outcomes

· Propose how each of our intellectual abilities and character traits plays a role in obtaining and evaluating credible information from different domains of knowledge.

· Develop a plan that would be useful to you in making sound decisions—outline that plan in steps and explain the importance of each step and its position in your plan.

· When given a particular problem to solve, write a series of questions you would need to answer in order to develop a trustworthy answer.

· Evaluate the credibility of sources of information.

Introductiononline homework help

Painting of Ophelia lying on the ground.

Ophelia

By John William Waterhouse, 1889

It’s easy to play the role of Ophelia and find your answers “whar [you] gits [your] corn pone.”1 It takes time, effort, patience, and a willingness to trust your opinions, live with uncertainty, and be willing to think independently of your peers. Often we think the concepts of “giving the professor (or whomever) what he or she wants” and independent thinking are mutually exclusive. But are they?

As you work your way through this course it is important you remember that our goals for you include the ability to think for yourself, neither as an Ophelia or Polonius, but as a person who carefully and fairly judges the evidence and makes sound choices.

Instructions

1. Read “Essay Prompt” and the “Grading Guide” so you know what is expected.

2. Prepare an outline to help you organize your thoughts.

3. I encourage you to use the words and ideas of others to support your claims; however,

a. Avoid plagiarism! Refer to “Plagiarism” in your syllabus for information to be sure you are not plagiarizing.

b. Use credible sources of information to substantiate your ideas!

4. This assignment must be no longer than one and a half pages, typed in 12-point Times New Roman font, double spaced, with 1-inch margins. Any citations (in text or Works Cited) should be in MLA style. (See the BYU Writing Center website for more information.)

Essay Prompt

Think about a belief or knowledge that you have. Do you claim ownership? If so, trace the actual development of your belief or knowledge. Critically examine the route, evaluating each piece of evidence that you used to develop your own ideas. If the belief is not yours, explain the steps you need to take in order to reach your own idea.

Grading Guide

  A range B range C range D/F range
Significance of Answer/Ideas Content is rich; ideas are well-developed, fresh and perceptive, convincing, or imaginative. Content is appropriate; ideas are adequately expressed with some fresh insights, few clichés, and little superficial thought. Content is somewhat superficial or repetitive; some attempt at thought-provoking insights but overall ordinary and trite. Content is very superficial or repetitive with little or no penetrating insights. Tends toward the obvious.
Organization Paragraphs are well defined and organized; logic flows smoothly from a full and clear thesis statement to coherent supporting arguments and builds to a convincing conclusion; principal ideas unify the paper; insignificant or irrelevant material not present. Emerging paragraph-length discourse; thesis is clear and logic follows; supporting arguments are largely in place and conclusion is overall convincing; essay provides many unifying ideas, but some insignificant or irrelevant material appears. Thesis is present but weak or variety of ideas causes logic to go astray; supporting arguments are weak or missing in places; weak conclusion; insignificant or irrelevant material predominant. Thesis is very weak or absent; little pattern of logic, clear supporting arguments; conclusion is very weak or lacking; rambling with no sense of direction.
Support Main ideas and arguments are well supported, including credible material from outside sources; support is imaginative, relevant, and sufficient. Main ideas and arguments are reasonably supported, including credible material from outside sources; support is largely imaginative, relevant, and sufficient. Main ideas and arguments are weakly supported or missing in areas; material mostly credible, but some lapses in judgment are apparent; support is more generalized, feeble, vague, and repetitious. Main ideas are arguments lacking in support; material is not credible or suspect; support is generalized, feeble, vague, and repetitious.
Expression Clear, natural, and appropriate language for formal writing is used (not cold and stilted but not colloquial or prone to slang); word and phrase choice apt and precise. Appropriate language is used in majority of writing; word and phrase choice are adequate with a few idiomatic expressions. Adequate language and word choice are used, but sometimes it is inaccurate and inappropriate. Inadequate language and word choice and or inaccurate use of vocabulary is present.
Technical Control Punctuation, capitalization, spelling, grammar, and syntax follow conventional rules; documentation of cited works consistent with MLA format and directions. Punctuation, capitalization, spelling, grammar, and syntax follow conventional rules—fewer than three mistakes; documentation of cited works is consistent with MLA format; format of paper is correct. Punctuation, capitalization, spelling, grammar, and syntax are reasonable—fewer than four mistakes; documentation of cited works is largely consistent with MLA format; format of paper is correct. Punctuation, capitalization, spelling, grammar, and syntax is flawed—five or more mistakes; documentation of cited works is flawed; format has flaws.

Formatting and Naming Your Assignment

Please follow these guidelines.

· Type your assignment in a word-processing program (such as Microsoft Word). The assignment should be double-spaced, in 12 pt. Times-Roman font, with 1-inch margins.

· Any citations (in text and works cited page) should be in MLA format (see the BYU Writing Center website for more information).

· Save the file in DOC or DOCX format.

· Name the file using the course number, your first and last name, and the assignment name for the filename. For example, BIO100_KimSmith_Portfolio3_YourOwnIdea.docx.

Submitting Your Assignment

When you are ready to submit your assignment,

1. Click on “Show Dropbox” at the bottom right of your screen.

2. Click on “Choose File.”

3. In the window that pops up, navigate to the document you want to submit.

4. Select the document and click “Open.”

5. In the comment box below, add any comments you have or any comments required by the assignment.

6. Once everything is ready, click “Submit.” A small icon will appear in the top right corner of the screen and on the navigation menu informing you that the assignment has been submitted and is ready for grading.

Portfolio Question 4: Termite Behavior: Using the Scientific Method to Know

Reminder

Your complete set of portfolio activities is the capstone project of this class. Thus, it is in your best interest to carefully read the instructions and information for this assignment and critically think about the best way to answer the question before you prepare and submit your work.

Connections to Learning Outcomes:

Lightbulb iconCarefully complete each phase of the portfolio assignment dealing with the termite experiment.  Note: for each exam, two portfolio questions will be randomly selected for grading, so take your time and do your best. It is in your best interest to carefully study the grading guide so you know exactly what is expected.

· Carefully observe phenomenon and record those observations.

· Write questions based on the observations—assess which questions are scientifically testable.

· Propose a hypothesis based on observations and questions that is testable, falsifiable, and predictive.

· Design an experimental protocol based on the hypothesis.

· Gather data, analyze the data, and organize the data into a format that communicates information clearly.

· Write a conclusion that is defendable based on the evidence collected.

Introduction to the Activity

Termites in a wooden structure

Photo by Stephanie Burdett

This activity lets you practice elements of the scientific method as best we can in an online environment. You’ll be filling out the  Termite Activity Worksheet  as you work your way through the activity. Save a copy of the worksheet, type your information into it, and submit it when you are finished.

Hint: As you go through the activity, it will help to use a printed or electronic copy to keep track of your answers. This will make it easier to format it for submission when you are done.

Next, watch the introduction video. This segment will give you some background on termite behavior and ecology.

Click here to watch video.

01—Termites

To read the transcript for this video, click here.

Now is a good time to check out the  grading guide  so you have a pretty good handle on what is expected.

Observations

There is a difference between casual and scientific observations. Good scientific observations include both qualitative (descriptive) and quantitative (numeric) data. In real life you might want to think of tools you could use to enhance observations. Details are important.

Click here to watch video.

02—Observations

To read the transcript for this video, click here.

For this segment of our activity, you need to record a minimum of four observations (more is better). For this assignment you will submit four carefully-crafted observational statements that will lead to interesting questions and a testable hypothesis.

Question Development

Think back to our lesson “Do You Know What You Should Think” and our discussion on asking good questions in order to find clear answers. You might want to review President Samuelson’s article to jog your memory.

Developing effective questions is an especially important concept in science: to promote problem solving, you need to ask effective questions.

Now you get to practice what you’ve learned previously. Based on your observations you’ll need to write two scientifically investigable questions.

Click here to watch video.

03—Question Development

To read the transcript for this video, click here.

Constructing a Hypothesis

Remember, a hypothesis is a proposed explanation for a set of phenomena and is often based not only on observation but on prior experience, scientific background knowledge, and logic.

In this class, we’ll have you write a highly formalized hypothesis so that you clearly identify the independent and dependent variables, showing a strong relationship between the two, and make a clear prediction. A strong, clear hypothesis will help you design a good experiment!

To do this let’s review some vocabulary:

· INDEPENDENT VARIABLE (A)—the variable you, the scientist, control or change

· DEPENDENT VARIABLE (B)—the variable that you observe or measure the results of

· PREDICTION—a rigorous statement (often quantitative) forecasting what will happen under specific conditions

Remember, the observed outcome of the dependent variable depends on how you manipulate the independent variable.

Hypothesis statement format: If A (independent variable) is related to B (dependent variable), then __________________ (prediction).

The structure of a formalized hypothesis is useful because it make you focus on a single independent variable and its relationship to the dependent variable(s). Plus, it forces you to make a prediction of how manipulating the independent variable will affect the dependent variable.

For example:

If annual rainfall is related to the thickness of annual growth rings in trees, then examining wood samples will reveal correlations in the growth rings to the historical records for rainfall in that environment.

Beware! Not all if–then statements are hypotheses. An example of an if–then statement that isn’t a hypothesis might be “If heavier-than-normal rainfall occurs in one year, then the annual growth ring for that year will be thicker.” This is a simple prediction, not a hypothesis. The problem with this statement is that there is no proposition to test. What is related to what? Is rainfall a variable? Is growth a variable?

Now, you’ll select one of your investigable questions and construct a formalized hypothesis.

Click here to watch video.

04—Constructing a Hypothesis

To read the transcript for this video, click here.

Experimental Design

“Because the validity of an experiment is directly affected by its construction and execution, attention to experimental design is extremely important.” 1 Scientists analyze the data that an experiment produces, so it’s vital to put in the time and effort required to properly design an experiment. If you’ve designed the experiment well, it will produce the right type of data, and you will be able to answer the question quickly and efficiently.

You’ve clearly identified the question the experiment is intended to answer. Now you should focus on identifying expected conflicting variables so that there is only one variable of interest that is being manipulated—this is a major way you can improve the quality of your answer. Of course, it is impossible to identify and eliminate all extraneous variables however you should eliminate as many as possible.

The students that take this course on campus in a face-to-face environment have the opportunity to actually do the termite activity. They make actual observations and carry out experiments. Since an online course does not have this luxury, I’m going to tell you the six directions virtually every on-campus student takes when writing a hypothesis.

· Ink color—the color of the ink is what attracts termites to the circle

· Shape—the geometric shape drawn affects whether or not termites follow the ink path

· Smell/taste—termites are attracted to the smell of the ink, or they like the taste of the ink

· Texture—the stickiness, wetness, smoothness, etc. of the ink influences termite movement

· Indentation—the recess in the surface of the paper forms a pathway the termites follow

Does one of these fit your hypothesis? Great! If not, then don’t worry. Write up your experimental design based on your hypothesis.

Take some time to carefully design an experiment to test your hypothesis. Use bullet points to briefly describe your experimental protocol including how you plan to eliminate unwanted variables and the sorts of data you will collect.

Click here to watch video.

05—Experimental Design

To read the transcript for this video, click here.

Record the Experimental Data

Evaluating an idea in light of the evidence should be simple, right? Either the results match the expectations or they don’t. Sometimes this is true, but in the real world things are usually more complex and messy, which means it’s not so straightforward to interpret the evidence that pertains to your idea. For these reasons it is crucial to have a good idea of the data you want to collect from an experiment and be scrupulous when collecting that data.

Because we are not in a face-to-face class, you were not able to actually carry out your own experimental design. We still want you to have the experience of collecting and analyzing data, so we’ve set up five of the most common experimental designs Biology 100 students have created in the past. Select the idea that best fits your hypothesis, click on the link and collect the data. Make sure you organize your data so it is clear and tells a story.

Ink Color

Click here to watch video.

06—Ink Color

To read the transcript for this video, click here.

Shape

Click here to watch video.

07—Shape

To read the transcript for this video, click here.

Smell/Taste

Click here to watch video.

08—Smell/Taste

To read the transcript for this video, click here.

Texture

Click here to watch video.

09—Texture

To read the transcript for this video, click here.

Indentation

Click here to watch video.

10—Indentation

To read the transcript for this video, click here.

Analyze the Data—Write a Conclusion

Data analysis is perhaps the trickiest part of any scientific endeavor. The same data may be interpreted in different ways. After many rounds of experiments, arguments, and analysis, the scientific community usually reaches a concensus about how a set of data should be interpreted but this process usually involves additional lines of evidence.

For this activity we are not interested if you “got the right answer” as to why the termites behave as they did. We are interested that you show deep thought, logic, and application of the evicence (data) in your conclusion.

Recap

For this part of the activity we’ll look at potential problems with various experiments. After watching this segment, you’ll write down two uncertainties you have about the conclusion you just wrote (i.e., why you might be not completely confident in your conclusion). At this point you may want to go back and view the other experiments.

Click here to watch video.

11—Recap

To read the transcript for this video, click here.

Reflection

Now that you’ve completed the termite activity, you’ll reflect on the principles to which you were introduced in this unit and put into practice in this lesson by answering two questions. You might want to review your notes, the Explorable website, and the assigned reading in your textbook to help you prepare your answers.

Formatting and Naming Your Assignment

Please follow these guidelines.

· Type your information in the  Termite Activity Worksheet .

· Any citations (in text and works cited page) should be in MLA format (see the BYU Writing Center website for more information).

· Save the file in DOC or DOCX format.

· Name the file using the course number, your first and last name, and the assignment name for the filename. For example, BIO100_KimSmith_TermiteActivity_Unit2Lesson3.docx

Submitting Your Assignment

When you are ready to submit your assignment,

1. Click on “Show Dropbox” at the bottom right of your screen.

2. Click on “Choose File.”

3. In the window that pops up, navigate to the document you want to submit.

4. Select the document and click “Open.”

5. In the comment box below, add any comments you have or any comments required by the assignment.

6. Once everything is ready, click “Submit.” A small icon will appear in the top right corner of the screen and on the navigation menu informing you that the assignment has been submitted and is ready for grading.

Portfolio Question #4

The Logic of Hypothesis Testing

Important information about completing this assignment:

1. Please thoughtfully and carefully respond to each question and exercise. It is not important whether or not you are able to come up with the “right” answer. As you can see from the grading guide your work will be assessed based on your ability to think and work as a scientist!

2. Make sure you format your paper so that you’ve included titles for each part of the activity and that you submit your document properly

The Activity:

A. Title: Observations

· Record at least 4 observations:

B. Title: Question Development

· Write down at least 2 questions generated from your observations. Make sure the questions you pose are suitable for firsthand scientific investigation:

C. Title: Constructing A Hypothesis

· Select one investigable question from the list you made in question B and use it to construct a hypothesis. Make sure you write a highly formalized hypothesis – If….then statement that focuses on a single independent variable and clearly shows its relationship to the dependent variable. Don’t forget to include a prediction:

D. Title: Experimental Design

· Design an experiment to test your hypothesis. Use bullet points to briefly describe your experimental protocol. You should carefully think about materials, methods, how you will control for extraneous variable, and the data you will collect:

E. Title: Data From The Experiment

· Think about the types of data (qualitative and quantitative) that you want to collect to provide evidence for the hypothesis. Collect suitable data and display it appropriately (graphically, textually, etc.)

· List strengths and weaknesses of this experiment (i.e. what variables weren’t appropriately controlled, etc.)

F. Title: Data Analysis – Conclusion

· Analyze your data. Provide at least 4 pieces of evidence from your analysis that either support or refute your hypothesis.

· Use bullet points to succinctly outline the main points of your conclusion:

G. Title: Recap

· Record at least 2 uncertainties you have (Use bullet points to give any reasons why you are not completely confident in your results/conclusion):

H. Title: Reflection

Review your notes from previous discussions and readings in the textbook to help you prepare your answers.

1. Record at One of the major tenets behind science is that any scientific hypothesis and the experimental design based on that hypothesis must be falsifiable. Briefly, provide an explanation for why falsifiability is the foundation of scientific experimentation and why this principle leads to scientific advancements in knowledge. Limit your answer to no more than 1 page, double-spaced, 12 point font.

2. Using the given vocabulary words where appropriate, summarize the process of turning an investigable question into a hypothesis. Limit your answer to no more than 1 page, double-spaced, 12 point font.

· Scientifically testable

· Prediction

· Falsifiable

· Independent Variable

· Dependent variable(s)

· Controlled variables/conflicting variables

Calculate your paper price
Pages (550 words)
Approximate price: -

Why Choose Us

Quality Papers

At Myhomeworkwriters.com, we always aim at 100% customer satisfaction. As such, we never compromise o the quality of our homework services. Our homework helpers ensure that they craft each paper carefully to match the requirements of the instruction form.

Professional Academic Writers

With Myhomeworkwriters.com, every student is guaranteed high-quality, professionally written papers. We ensure that we hire individuals with high academic qualifications who can maintain our quality policy. These writers undergo further training to sharpen their writing skills, making them more competent in writing academic papers.

Affordable Prices

Our company maintains a fair pricing system for all academic writing services to ensure affordability. Our pricing system generates quotations based on the properties of individual papers.

On-Time delivery

My Homework Writers guarantees all students of swift delivery of papers. We understand that time is an essential factor in the academic world. Therefore, we ensure that we deliver the paper on or before the agreed date to give students ample time for reviewing.

100% Originality

Myhomeworkwriters.com maintains a zero-plagiarism policy in all papers. As such, My Homework Writers professional academic writers ensure that they use the students’ instructions to deliver plagiarism-free papers. We are very keen on avoiding any chance of similarities with previous papers.

Customer Support 24/7

Our customer support works around the clock to provide students with assistance or guidance at any time of the day. Students can always communicate with us through our live chat system or our email and receive instant responses. Feel free to contact us via the Chat window or support email: support@myhomeworkwriters.com.

Try it now!

Calculate the price of your order

You will get a personal manager and a discount.
We'll send you the first draft for approval by at
Total price:
$0.00

How it works?

Follow these simple steps to get your paper done

Place your order

Fill in the order form and provide all details of your assignment.

Proceed with the payment

Choose the payment system that suits you most.

Receive the final file

Once your paper is ready, we will email it to you.

Our Homework Writing Services

My Homework Writers holds a reputation for being a platform that provides high-quality homework writing services. All you need to do is provide us with all the necessary requirements of the paper and wait for quality results.

Essays

Essay Writing Services

At My Homework Writers, we have highly qualified academic gurus who will offer great assistance towards completing your essays. Our homework writing service providers are well-versed with all the aspects of developing high-quality and relevant essays.

Admissions

Admission and Business Papers

With Myhomeworkwriters.com, we will help you secure a position at your desired institution. Our essay writing services include the crafting of admissions papers. We will still help you climb your career ladder by helping you write the official papers that will help you secure a job. We will guide you on how to write an outstanding portfolio or resume.

Editing

Editing and Proofreading

Myhomeworkwriters.com has a professional editorial team that will help you organize your paper, paraphrase it, and eliminate any possible mistakes. Also, we will help you check on plagiarism to ensure that your final paper posses quality and originality.

Coursework

Technical papers

My Homework Writers harbors professional academic writers from diverse academic disciplines. As such, we can develop homework writing services in all academic areas. The simplicity or complexity of the paper does not affect the quality of homework writing services.